Creating Healthy Smiles, One Smile At A Time

Tag Archives: Dentistry For Children

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What if you, as a parent who has a very young child with a cavity, is told that instead of a 30 minute long appointment consisting of the dreaded shot, drilling, and no small amount of drama, that we could very simply, in less than a minute paint a magic substance on your child’s cavity, and voila, cavity is taken care?

Well, what if we told you that such a substance has been used in Japan for the past 80 years, can apparently basically ‘freeze’ cavities in place eliminating the need for placing a filling, and that the cost of such treatment is fairly low.  Sounds good doesn’t it?

That magic substance is Silver Diamine Fluoride (SDF).  It is a colorless liquid consisting of 24-28% silver and 5% fluoride. The FDA recently approved this for use as a cavity varnish placed on enamel to reduce tooth sensitivity.  Though it hasn’t been technically approved for use in the treatment of cavities, some dentists have started using SDF ‘off-label’ (which is allowed) for management of the aforementioned cavities.

As we alluded to in the introduction, the dentist simply dries the tooth with the cavity, swabs a small amount of the SDF liquid on the tooth, allows it to dry (1-2 minutes), and you’re done – the cavity is arrested (which means it kills the bacteria causing the cavity, hardens dentin, and promotes re-mineralization or hardening of the surrounding enamel).

Of course, as with any treatment option, there are some downsides to this treatment.  The most significant is that any tooth treated with SDF will turn black in color.  To be completely fair, only the cavity turns black, but when we say black, we mean BLACK. Not a slight discoloration, or graying. Black.

It also requires multiple applications for complete success, cannot be used in individuals who have silver allergies, can cause irritation to gum tissue, and has a slight metallic taste when first applied.

While SDF has been used for decades in not only Japan, but also Brazil, Peru, Australia, Thailand and a slew of other Asian countries, studies looking at its efficacy, and safety in the U.S. are limited. To date, there have only been 14 reputable studies on SDF; 7 of which have been completed, 5 that are recruiting, and 2 that have not yet begun recruiting.

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Child patient with cavities in front teeth treated with SDF

Despite it’s drawbacks, there is probably a place for SDF in dentistry.  Patients who are unable to tolerate extensive or any dental treatment such as the very young, very old, and/or medically compromised seem like candidates who would benefit from this very non invasive treatment.  However, it needs to be understood, that this is not a cure for cavities – it is simply managing a disease process until such time that more definitive treatment (ie. filling, crown) can be completed. Furthermore, more research need to be done around issues of effectiveness, long term safety and treatment protocols.

Stay tuned!

(Click here for a recent New York Times article on this issue)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

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Lest we be accused of not being afraid of wading into controversial topics, a recent article in the Wall Street Journal caught our eye.  Not that it had anything to do with dentistry per say, but the title “Can You Sleep Train Your Baby At 2 Months”  was tantalizing none the less.

The article centered on the sleep philosophy of a prominent pediatric group in Tribeca (that would be a neighborhood in the center of the universe, otherwise known as Manhattan) which advocated ‘ferberizing’ infants at 2 months of age so as to improve their nightly sleeping habits.

The Ferber method, or Feberization, is a technique invented by Dr. Ferber who  promoted the idea of letting babies ‘cry it out’ and develop the ability to self-soothe and fall asleep on their own.

The basic idea is to leave the baby in the room, leave, and return at progressively increasing intervals to comfort the crying baby (without picking him or her up). With each night, these intervals increase until the baby is asleep.  Dr. Ferber felt that by age 6 months of age, this technique is appropriate as most babies are capable of sleeping through the night by that age and don’t need night feeding.

The WSJ article profiled a practice that goes one step further, and their recommendation is to sleep train babies at age 2 months.  Of course, in the interest of a balanced informed article, both advocates and detractors of this method discussed the pluses and minuses of sleep  training at so young an age.  This is a highly emotionally charged issue with both sides accusing the other of being absolutely wrong.  I suspect this debate will go on for the foreseeable future.

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Row of pacifiers hanging next to baby laundry

So why was this article on how to put your baby to sleep of interest to a pediatric dentist? Simply put, we face a similar conundrum on a daily basis at our practice and that is the issue of pacifier use.  Pacifiers certainly have their place in soothing very young infants, and parents (myself included) would be quick to say that they work well in getting that fussy baby of yours to calm down, even fall asleep.  However, pacifiers do become a problem when used for too long, especially once baby teeth start growing in.  Long term use of a pacifier can cause significant malocclusion, specifically distorting the position of the front teeth, causing large overbites, failure of the front teeth to be able to close, and even impeding in the widening of the palate – all ingredients for orthodontics at an early age.

Most children be getting weaned off the pacifier starting by age 2, and our recommendations is that they stop by age 4.  Anything beyond can cause the developmental problems listed above.

The takeaway from the WSJ article for this pediatric dentist is that one CAN train your child be it to fall asleep or stop using the pacifier.  The basic technique(similar to that of Dr. Ferber)  is that of being consistent and over time decrease the amount of time your child is allowed to use the pacifier.  Our thought is that the earlier one starts (or if you never start at all!), the easier the pacifier removal will be.  Clearly if some parents can train their 2 month old to sleep through the night, pacifier removal should be a cinch!

 

 

 

 

 

 


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What do Powerade, Gatorade, Vitamin water, Lemonade, Energy drinks, Snapple and Sprite have in common?

They are all cavity causing if one consumes these popular  drinks in large quantities.

Most people intrinsically realize that soda is bad for their teeth.  The average middle school student (or at least my kid) has done the baby tooth in a cup of soda experiment, so in general most of us recognize that carbonated sugar water is highly acidic and can lead to one’s tooth slowly dissolving away.

A recent article in the Journal of the American Dental Association explores this even further, investigating the pH of hundreds of beverages.  pH as one may recall from chemistry class, is a measure of acidity or alkalinity of a solution.  Low pH (less than 4.0) can lead to the destruction of tooth structure even in the absence of cavity causing bacteria.  In short – acidity in drinks is not healthy for your teeth.

It might come as a surprise to a lot of people that there the vast majority of commercially available drinks such as sports drinks, vitamin waters, and  ‘healthy’ fruit juices have very low pH’s.

The most acidic beverages tested (all with a pH less than 2.4) were lemon juice, RC Cola, Coca-Cola Classic, Coca-Cola Cherry and Pepsi.

And the least ‘acidic’ beverage tested? Municipal water from Birmingham, Alabama which at a pH of 7.2 proves that when it comes to healthy teeth, water is the way to go.

For your viewing pleasure, here are tables taken from the actual article (Reddy, Avanija, Don F. Norris, Stephanie S. Momeni, Belinda Waldo, and John D. Ruby. “The PH of Beverages in the United States.” The Journal of the American Dental Association 147.4 (2016): 255-63. Web) showing the tested pH levels of most drinks from on the shelves of our grocery stores.  Take a look and see where your favorite drink fits in.

 

 

 

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The New York Times is always a good read.  Recently, in honor of April Fools Day, it ran a  series   that highlighted common misconceptions and sought to debunk some of these common myths. Check out misconception #5.

The misconceptions (in no particular order) are:

  • Exercise builds strong bones
  • In an asteroid belt, spaceships have to dodge a fusillade of oncoming rocks
  • The universe started somewhere
  • Spree killers must be mentally ill
  • Baby teeth don’t matter
  • Climate change is not real because there is snow in my yard
  • Migranes are psychological manifestations of women’s inability to manage stress and emotions

a2f8728d524365191783e23b8738836eI certainly can’t claim to be an expert on osteoporosis, the mysteries of space, psychosis, the environment or migranes, so I’m in no position to rebut or support any of these common myths.  But it is fair to say that I know a few things about Baby teeth.  And yes, they do matter!

 


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We’re   always on the lookout for the latest in dentistry, and this newish entry to the world of burgeoning oral health products caught our eye.  Developed by an orthodontist, it is a patented disclosing toothpaste (Plaque HD) which is designed to help patients with braces to brush better.

One of the greatest challenges when it comes to braces (especially the traditional metal Heavy-Plaque-on-Patient-with-Bracesones) is brushing.  Food and plaque tends to build up very easily, causing significant gingivitis to the point where the gums can grow over the braces and cover one’s teeth completely.  This can also lead to extremely significant cavities, the cost of repair approaching the cost of the braces themselves.  We’re talking thousands of dollars. Gulp!

But how does one know that you are doing an adequate job?  For our younger patients who don’t brush well, we give out disclosing tablets (there are also mouth rinses).  These tablets, which are chewed after an initial round of brushing, get incorporated into plaque that hasn’t been brushed off, turning these areas pink.  Hence, one can actually see the areas that are being missed, and can go back and brush the pink off.  Aside from a great educational tool, it is great fun for the kids to see their teeth turn pink.

Plaque HD incorporates this disclosing agent in their fluoride cavity preventing toothpaste. Instead of pink, it turns teeth green in areas that haven’t been brushed well (ie. plaque is accumulating) and serves as a visual cue for patients to go back and brush in those areas.  The benefit of this toothpaste is that it’s a one step process – simply  brush, look for green areas and then brush again until removed.

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This is a fabulous idea that is a long time coming. It’s applications are not limited only to patients with braces but can be used by anybody who brushes poorly. It is a vast improvement from the traditional disclosing tablet route which is more labor intensive, messy and takes more time.  The toothpaste retails for $21 (direct to consumer) which may seem like a lot, but keep in mind that even one small white composite filling costs significantly more.  Think of the toothpaste as an investment for not only a beautiful smile, but a healthy one. We think this is a win-win for all.

 


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Oy! So your teenager wants to get a piercing.  And not just a cute little earring, but a cool one that expresses her individuality, and wait a minute, she wants it in her tongue. What’s a parent to do?

It’s a well known fact that teenagers don’t think like adults – they are impulsive, narcissistic and aren’t capable of thinking about the effects of their behavior on other people (or themselves for that matter). Their frontal lobes aren’t quite developed, so since their insight is impaired, it makes perfect sense to them that getting a tongue piercing is completely normal and safe.

imagesCAS6M8XROne should know that oral piercings (tongue, lip, and cheek), are associated with a number of adverse oral and systemic conditions.  Parents should inform their teenagers of the risks of piercings which are significant. In fact, the American Dental Association opposes the practice of intraoral/perioral piercing.

Piercing related risks include:

  1. Infectious Disease transmission: Oral piercing has been identified as a possible factor in the transmission of hepatitis B, C, D and G.
  2. Infection: The mouth is filled with millions of bacteria and oral piercing creates an opportunity for these bacteria to infect the piercing site. These infections can bepiercing gross quite serious, leading to swelling, inflammation, cellulitis and even endocarditis.
  3. Nerve and blood vessel damage: The tongue has lots of blood vessels and nerves.  One can puncture a nerve leading to temporary and even permanent numbing of the tongue.  This damage can affect your sense of taste and ability to move your tongue.
  4. Injury to gums: The metal bars and caps in oral jewelry can cause gum recession and damage leading to long term sensitivity and potential bone loss.
  5. Tooth damage: Metal jewelry can lead to tooth fracture, abrasion, increased imagesCAB0QS5Gsensitivity, cracking of fillings and tooth wear.
  6. Airway obstruction: Oral piercings have many parts that can come loose, leading to inadvertent swallowing or aspiration (when foreign objects go into the lung)
  7. Allergic reaction:  A hypersensitivity reaction — called allergic contact dermatitis to the metal (nickel) in the jewelry can occur in susceptible people.
  8. Compromised Dental Care: Oral piercings can prevent dentists from taking clear x-rays and not allow proper treatment to be recommended.

And while your teenager typically does not think adults know what they are talking about, it is important to inform them of the dangers associated with oral piercing.  Sometimes they do hear what you are saying.


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Turns out people don’t read anymore.  Despite the incredible quantity of articles, links, news reports, texts, emails,  online op-ed pieces, listicles,  facebook     posts and blogging, sociologists have found that most of us don’t read beyond the headline (hence the success of the 140 character tweet).

In fact, if you have made it this far reading this blog, congratulations, you’re in the minority of people who read these days (I wouldn’t expect anything less from our blog readers!).

It seems that we prefer looking at pictures versus reading words.  It’s been shown that blog posts with pictures get more hits, and the top apps used by teenagers and young adults is not Facebook or Twitter (involves more reading than these millennials prefer) but are Snapchat and Instagram.  These two apps are photo based and provide instant gratification and an endorphin rush for those who receive hundreds of likes.

So in the interest of being au courant and in tune with our patients and young parents, we recently launched an Instagram  page for our practice. We are still trying to figure out how best to keep connected with our dental family, but this is yet another step for us into this new (or not so new) world of social media.

Oh….and in case you missed it, click  here    to   check out our instagram   page.  And ‘heart’ us. And ‘follow’ us.  We promise – you won’t be easily bored!